"Soul Shouting" Sample  LIVE SOUL-JAZZ QUINTET
Straight No Chaser Dan Moretti & The Hammond Boys – J. Siegel Moretti is a gifted improviser who projects an authoritative presence, while reaping optimum support from his superb rhythm section.
 

 

"Soul Shouting" Sample  LIVE SOUL-JAZZ QUINTET Straight No Chaser Dan Moretti & The Hammond Boys – J. Siegel Moretti is a gifted improviser who projects an authoritative presence, while reaping optimum support from his superb rhythm section.  

 

The Hammond Boys

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Acoustic quartet with strings.  All original Jazz-Based Music influenced by ECM.

 
 
  FULL ALBUM YOU TUBE

Acoustic quartet with strings.  All original Jazz-Based Music influenced by ECM.

      FULL ALBUM YOU TUBE

Invoke Quartet and Strings

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Sample "Off The One"  PIANO-LESS TRIO
all about jazz.com
"Medeski, Martin & Wood with Sax – V. Rogger 
Tres Muse is "Medeski, Martin & Wood with sax instead of keys....Hyperkinetic instrumental alchemy"
 

 Tres Muse Purchase

Sample "Off The One"  PIANO-LESS TRIO all about jazz.com "Medeski, Martin & Wood with Sax – V. Rogger  Tres Muse is "Medeski, Martin & Wood with sax instead of keys....Hyperkinetic instrumental alchemy"  

Tres Muse Purchase

Tres Muse

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Sample "Podunk"  BLUE-NOTE STYLED QUINTET
Something Else S. Victor Aaron
Curt Ramm/Dan Moretti/Bill Cunliffe – Foundations
"The songs all pack punch of varying intensity with logically constructed melodies, ranging from the no-nonsense post-bop swing to a contemporary minded rendering of the soul-jazz and hard bop found on so many classic Blue Note records."

 
 Foundations Purchase

Sample "Podunk"  BLUE-NOTE STYLED QUINTET Something Else S. Victor Aaron Curt Ramm/Dan Moretti/Bill Cunliffe – Foundations "The songs all pack punch of varying intensity with logically constructed melodies, ranging from the no-nonsense post-bop swing to a contemporary minded rendering of the soul-jazz and hard bop found on so many classic Blue Note records."

  Foundations Purchase

Foundations Traditional Blue Note Quintet

The Journey
 

 POLV CD Purchase here

The Journey  

POLV CD Purchase here

The Piccola Orchestra La Viola Accordion Orchestra

WARCH LIVE FROM ITALY

Passing Place – ejazznews
Well!!!.....Let's talk about some serious bebop horn lines & avante-garde that works. The combined group puts forth a certain virtuosity which is breathtalking. Moretti's improvised horn lines are technically superb.George Carroll


\ Passing Place Purchase Download mp3 here

Passing Place – ejazznews Well!!!.....Let's talk about some serious bebop horn lines & avante-garde that works. The combined group puts forth a certain virtuosity which is breathtalking. Moretti's improvised horn lines are technically superb.George Carroll

\ Passing Place Purchase Download mp3 here

Once Through "Passing Place" Contemporary Jazz Sextet

Stories Purchase

Stories Purchase

Once Through "Stories" Contemporary Jazz Sextet

Once Through Purchase

Once Through Purchase

Dan Moretti & Once Through Contemporary Jazz Quartet

 
 
 Latin Genesis Purchase

    Latin Genesis Purchase

Latin Genesis w/Dave Liebman

December Solstice Purchase

December Solstice Purchase

December Solstice

The Funky Psychic horns tear it up on the Whaling City Sound Release The Psychic Horns  
All masters of their instruments, The Psychic Horns are John Allmark, trumpet, John Wheeler, trombone and Dan Moretti, woodwinds. Their debut album runs with a play list of originals by Allmark and Moretti plus two pieces of familiar music. The liner notes hawk the varied backgrounds of the players, funk, pop, jazz, etc., and there's a tad of all here, with contemporary pop (rock) appearing to prevail. While the three horn players get the prime spot on the marquee, the smeary keyboard of John Cook and the drum's back beat get equal time and are sometimes distracting with their monotonous beat. Nonetheless, there are biting and infectious rhythms found in the original material, like Allmark's "Monday Night at Amsterdam's" and Moretti's aptly dubbed "Trippin'". The latter's coda alone is worth working through the repetitive, cloying chorus of the keyboards and rat-a-tat-of the drums. The album's shocker is a modern dressing of the usually benign "Have You Met Miss Jones" which kicks off with crashing measures seguing into a rough and ready treatment of the melody line. Then comes the improvising by Allmark's sharp tongued trumpet. This track proves again that for the most part, the chord structures of classic and jazz standards offer the best opportunities for imaginative jazz players to extemporize. Giving the ears some relief, Ben Cook sets aside the keyboards for a piano, or at least turns on the piano switch. The coda trails off into some more structured dissonance. By far, this is the premier track on the album because of its devil may care arrangement allowing the performers to display their not insignificant skills.
The music found here is neither relaxing nor easy on the vascular system. The performers goat it with a vengeance on every cut. If you like exciting, varied music, then you will fully enjoy this album. Traditionalists will have a more difficult time. But if psychic is used as a prediction of things to come for this group, you better tighten your seat belt and batten down the hatches.

The Funky Psychic horns tear it up on the Whaling City Sound Release The Psychic Horns   All masters of their instruments, The Psychic Horns are John Allmark, trumpet, John Wheeler, trombone and Dan Moretti, woodwinds. Their debut album runs with a play list of originals by Allmark and Moretti plus two pieces of familiar music. The liner notes hawk the varied backgrounds of the players, funk, pop, jazz, etc., and there's a tad of all here, with contemporary pop (rock) appearing to prevail. While the three horn players get the prime spot on the marquee, the smeary keyboard of John Cook and the drum's back beat get equal time and are sometimes distracting with their monotonous beat. Nonetheless, there are biting and infectious rhythms found in the original material, like Allmark's "Monday Night at Amsterdam's" and Moretti's aptly dubbed "Trippin'". The latter's coda alone is worth working through the repetitive, cloying chorus of the keyboards and rat-a-tat-of the drums. The album's shocker is a modern dressing of the usually benign "Have You Met Miss Jones" which kicks off with crashing measures seguing into a rough and ready treatment of the melody line. Then comes the improvising by Allmark's sharp tongued trumpet. This track proves again that for the most part, the chord structures of classic and jazz standards offer the best opportunities for imaginative jazz players to extemporize. Giving the ears some relief, Ben Cook sets aside the keyboards for a piano, or at least turns on the piano switch. The coda trails off into some more structured dissonance. By far, this is the premier track on the album because of its devil may care arrangement allowing the performers to display their not insignificant skills. The music found here is neither relaxing nor easy on the vascular system. The performers goat it with a vengeance on every cut. If you like exciting, varied music, then you will fully enjoy this album. Traditionalists will have a more difficult time. But if psychic is used as a prediction of things to come for this group, you better tighten your seat belt and batten down the hatches.

The Psychic Horns

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